Tag Archives: EU

Ph.D. Defense: Pics, Slides ‘n’ Thanks

On 25 November, I defended my thesis and obtained my degree as a doctor in law during a public ceremony in the University of Amsterdam church aula. And a ceremony it was: a rather dramatic affair, complete with magic wands, fake candles, druid robes, hobbit-hats and sciency spells – all set in holy surroundings. I couldn’t have imagined a more suitable finale to the innings. Here are some pics and the slides of my introductory talk. Thanks to my Committee and all of you for being there in spirit, or in the flesh. You’ve all made this a finale I’ll always remember fondly.  Continue reading Ph.D. Defense: Pics, Slides ‘n’ Thanks

BREAKING :) abstract and download of my Ph.D. thesis ‘Securing Private Communications’ [open access]

The academic version of my thesis — titled ‘Securing Private Communications’ — is available online. I already committed it to the web in my previous blogpost on my public Ph.D. defense on 25 November 2015 (open to the public). But a friend of mine told me to once again post my abstract and download link for my thesis separately and make that clear in the title of the post. And make it BREAKING news. Ha! Here goes.  Continue reading BREAKING :) abstract and download of my Ph.D. thesis ‘Securing Private Communications’ [open access]

Expert Panel Report: A New Governance Model for Communications Security?

Published 5 December 2014 on Freedom to Tinker.

Today, the vulnerable state of electronic communications security dominates headlines across the globe, while surveillance, money and power increasingly permeate the ‘cybersecurity’ policy arena. With the stakes so high, how should communications security be regulated? Deirdre Mulligan (UC Berkeley), Ashkan Soltani (independent, Washington Post), Ian Brown (Oxford) and Michel van Eeten (TU Delft) weighed in on this proposition at an expert panel on my doctoral project at the Amsterdam Information Influx conference. Continue reading Expert Panel Report: A New Governance Model for Communications Security?

Opinie FD en Lezing Eerste Kamer: ‘Nederland als Internetdokter tussen Cybergrootmachten’

Op 6 mei mocht ik een bijdrage leveren aan de expertsessie ‘Cyberintelligence en Publiek Belang’ in de Eerste Kamer. Het ontwikkelen van inzicht in de Snowden-onthullingen stond daarin centraal. Het Financieel Dagblad publiceerde gisteren een bewerking van mijn lezing op de Opiniepagina. Klik op het plaatje hieronder om het stuk te lezen, waarin ik probeer in te gaan op welke rol voor Nederland is weggelegd nu we ons geconfronteerd zien met genetwerkte communicatie-omgeving van totale surveillance. De opinie is voor een breed publiek en daarom wat simpeler. De volledige tekst van mijn langere lezing heb ik daaronder integraal opgenomen. De lezing is wat anders van toon, want gericht aan senatoren, en bevat meer technische en juridische lagen.

UPDATE: Mede op basis van mijn lezing, heeft de Eerste Kamer een aantal moties aangenomen over privacy en security na Snowden.

Continue reading Opinie FD en Lezing Eerste Kamer: ‘Nederland als Internetdokter tussen Cybergrootmachten’

Slides Hoorcollege over Snowden-onthullingen: ‘Internationale Dataflows & Cloud Surveillance’

Net twee uur college gegeven bij het vak ‘privacy & gegevensbescherming’ aan masterstudenten infomatierecht van de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Het college geeft een overzicht van een paar belangrijke onthullingen rondom de praktijk van intelligence surveillance, plaatst ze in politiek-historisch perspectief en gaat wat dieper in op de beweegredenen van inlichtingendiensten ‘to know it all’. Na de pauze bespreek ik welke oplossingsrichtingen recht, beleid en technologie bieden. Ook een aantal nieuwe onthullingen in het gisteren gepubliceerde boek van Greenwald komen aan bod. Klik op de openingsslide hieronder om alle 100+ slides te zien (geen zorgen, veel plaatjes).

Any Colour You Like: the History (and Future?) of Internet Security Policy [talk]

Yesterday, I did a first in a series of talks on over four decades of internet security policies. A tedious piece of research, that I don’t think anyone has done before.  It’s a cornerstone of my thesis, and I’m currently finishing a draft chapter/paper on the topic under the same title – borrowing names from Pink Floyd seems to become a tradition of sorts.

So here’s my slides for the 27 March Cyberscholars Working Group at Harvard’s Berkman Center [pdf]. The talk was aimed to be 15 minutes long for a small and general audience, so obviously it’s a bit shallow. Questions, feedback, all more than welcome! I hope to get the paper out by the end of April. The abstract: Continue reading Any Colour You Like: the History (and Future?) of Internet Security Policy [talk]