Tag Archives: Metaphors

Art as Mirror – Slab City Internet Cafe [Pic]

Reminded of the dark side of the web by all the news lately, we’re all trying to make some sense of it all. Amidst kazillions of conferences, papers, OpEds and what have you, art can offer a more captivating snapshot of the dynamics of net technology, politics and culture. And hold up a mirror to confront you with all the madness, if you like. ‘Slab City Internet Cafe’ is a funny and quite accurate installation that captures how many feel about the web today. Continue reading Art as Mirror – Slab City Internet Cafe [Pic]

Watch Your Mouth: Why Talking ‘(Cyber-)Security’ Is Popular, Complex and Deeply Political

Everybody immediately relates to ‘security’, but may mean something profoundly different. This makes researching ‘security’ both difficult and important. My main concern is that we need a better understanding of what ‘(cyber-)security’ is and what it’s not, precisely because of it’s popular, complex and deeply political properties. Until then, we need to watch our mouth when we talk ‘(cyber-)security’, as ambigous concepts are a battleground for political exploitation.  Continue reading Watch Your Mouth: Why Talking ‘(Cyber-)Security’ Is Popular, Complex and Deeply Political

When an Ethnographer met Edward Snowden

Published 18 Oct. 2013 at Freedom to Tinker.

If you talk about ‘metadata’, ‘big data’ and ‘Big Brother’ just as easily as you order a pizza, ethnography and anthropology are probably not your first points of reference. But the outcome of a recent encounter of ethnographer Tom Boellstorff and Edward Snowden (not IRL but IRP), is that tech policy wonks and researchers should be careful with their day to day vocabulary, as concepts carry politics of control and power. Continue reading When an Ethnographer met Edward Snowden