Tag Archives: TLS

Governments Pwn The Web: A Constitutional Right to IT-Security? [talk]

The Berkman Center at Harvard has put my 18 March 2014 talk online. My aim was to get people new to the subject thinking about government hacking for spying and policing purposes, that is largely happening without public scrutiny or debate – particularly in the U.S. And what to do about it. States have been hacking since the 1970s, and prominently in the 80s, so my main message in the talk is that the policy debate lags at least three decades behind the technical reality. If you don’t have time to watch a one hour talk, here’s the slides [pdf] and a post for further reading. The talk develops the thoughts in the post a bit further, and sets an agenda for research, law and activism.

Watch Your Mouth: Why Talking ‘(Cyber-)Security’ Is Popular, Complex and Deeply Political

Everybody immediately relates to ‘security’, but may mean something profoundly different. This makes researching ‘security’ both difficult and important. My main concern is that we need a better understanding of what ‘(cyber-)security’ is and what it’s not, precisely because of it’s popular, complex and deeply political properties. Until then, we need to watch our mouth when we talk ‘(cyber-)security’, as ambigous concepts are a battleground for political exploitation.  Continue reading Watch Your Mouth: Why Talking ‘(Cyber-)Security’ Is Popular, Complex and Deeply Political

U.S. Citizenship and N.S.A. Surveillance – Legal Safeguard or Practical Backdoor?

Published 15 Oct. 2013 at Freedom to Tinker.

The main takeaway of two recent disclosures around N.S.A. surveillance practices, is that Americans must re-think ‘U.S. citizenship’ as the guiding legal principle to protect against untargeted surveillance of their communications. Currently, U.S. citizens may get some comfort through the usual political discourse that ‘ordinary Americans’ are protected, and this is all about foreigners. In this post, I’ll argue that this is not the case, that the legal backdoor of U.S. Citizenship is real and that relying on U.S. citizenship for protection is not in America’s interests. As a new CITP Fellow and a first time contributor to this amazing blog, I’ll introduce myself and my research interests along the way.   Continue reading U.S. Citizenship and N.S.A. Surveillance – Legal Safeguard or Practical Backdoor?