Tag Archives: Securitization

Slides Hoorcollege over Snowden-onthullingen: ‘Internationale Dataflows & Cloud Surveillance’

Net twee uur college gegeven bij het vak ‘privacy & gegevensbescherming’ aan masterstudenten infomatierecht van de Universiteit van Amsterdam. Het college geeft een overzicht van een paar belangrijke onthullingen rondom de praktijk van intelligence surveillance, plaatst ze in politiek-historisch perspectief en gaat wat dieper in op de beweegredenen van inlichtingendiensten ‘to know it all’. Na de pauze bespreek ik welke oplossingsrichtingen recht, beleid en technologie bieden. Ook een aantal nieuwe onthullingen in het gisteren gepubliceerde boek van Greenwald komen aan bod. Klik op de openingsslide hieronder om alle 100+ slides te zien (geen zorgen, veel plaatjes).

Any Colour You Like: the History (and Future?) of Internet Security Policy [talk]

Yesterday, I did a first in a series of talks on over four decades of internet security policies. A tedious piece of research, that I don’t think anyone has done before.  It’s a cornerstone of my thesis, and I’m currently finishing a draft chapter/paper on the topic under the same title – borrowing names from Pink Floyd seems to become a tradition of sorts.

So here’s my slides for the 27 March Cyberscholars Working Group at Harvard’s Berkman Center [pdf]. The talk was aimed to be 15 minutes long for a small and general audience, so obviously it’s a bit shallow. Questions, feedback, all more than welcome! I hope to get the paper out by the end of April. The abstract: Continue reading Any Colour You Like: the History (and Future?) of Internet Security Policy [talk]

Watch Your Mouth: Why Talking ‘(Cyber-)Security’ Is Popular, Complex and Deeply Political

Everybody immediately relates to ‘security’, but may mean something profoundly different. This makes researching ‘security’ both difficult and important. My main concern is that we need a better understanding of what ‘(cyber-)security’ is and what it’s not, precisely because of it’s popular, complex and deeply political properties. Until then, we need to watch our mouth when we talk ‘(cyber-)security’, as ambigous concepts are a battleground for political exploitation.  Continue reading Watch Your Mouth: Why Talking ‘(Cyber-)Security’ Is Popular, Complex and Deeply Political